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California New Car Dealers Association Releases Third Quarter Auto Outlook

Contact: Autumn Heacox, Communications and Marketing Director: aheacox@cncda.org, (916) 441-2599

Economic Uncertainty Results in Reduced New Car Sales Statewide
Toyota Holds California Market Share Lead as EV Sales Continue to Rise

Click on the Image Above to View the Report


Nov. 7, 2022 (SACRAMENTO)
– Franchised new car dealers in California are trying to catch up with high demand despite a decline in new car sales in the third quarter of 2022.  Click here to view the full report.

The weakened economy, supply chain issues, labor availability, and chip shortages all lead us to predict that new vehicle registrations in 2022 will only hit 1.68 million by the end of the year (lower than we anticipated last quarter).

Year-to-date, new vehicle sales in the United States dropped 13 percent as compared with 2021. Comparatively, California’s decline in sales slipped 16.1 percent when compared to the first nine months of 2021. While Q3 posted a statewide double-digit light vehicle registration decline for the fourth quarter in a row, that streak is expected to end as we reach the end of 2022 and anticipate an increase in these registrations.

Year over year, SUVs (both luxury and non-luxury) have increased market share by three percent, increasing from 48 percent in Q3 2021 to 51 percent in Q3 2022. The estimated electric vehicle (EV) market share hit 15.8 percent. Overall, this year the hybrid/ EV market share is at 29.9 percent.

“As California’s economy remains uncertain, statewide franchised new car dealers are encouraged by the continued strong consumer demand for vehicles of all makes and models,” said California New Car Dealers Association Chairman, John Oh, General Manager, Lexus of Westminster.

“Our dealers are anxiously awaiting an inventory influx of both internal combustion engine and electric vehicles from our manufacturers. We have long-standing relationships with our loyal customers and we’re ready and willing to help get them the vehicles they desire today. We simply need our manufacturers to make and send us more cars,” said Oh.

Brand Market Share

Toyota remains a vital mainstay in California, continuing to capture the largest segment of new car sales market share at 17.4 percent, followed by Tesla, then Ford rounding out the top three brands in California. Both Tesla and Genesis increased new vehicle registrations for Q3, while all other brands saw declines. Hybrids excluding plug-in registrations also rose year-to-date up to 11.2 percent; however, plug-in hybrid registrations declined slightly from last year, only reaching 2.9 percent of registrations so far this year.

Segment Market Share

Interestingly, midsize vehicles are performing much better than the overall market only down 13.2 percent while the industry average sits at 21.6 percent lower than last year. Two-row SUVs have been gaining market share in their segment, up 3.3 percent from 2019.  Light trucks accounted for 68.3 percent of the California new vehicle market compared to 78.9 percent in the Nation.

Model and Brand Rankings

The Tesla Model Y remains the top-selling light truck in the California market with 61,544 registrations this year. In second place: the Toyota RAV4 with 44,738 units sold.  The top-selling passenger car model YTD in the state is the Tesla Model 3 with 56,851 registrations and the Toyota Camry came in second with 40,350 registrations capturing 10.2 percent of the market share. As with last quarter, the state’s top-selling mainstays were impacted by inventory shortages.

Regional Variances

Both Northern and Southern California performed similarly in terms of the percentage of change year to date, with percentage declines of 16.2 and 16.8, respectively. As with last quarter, the San Francisco Bay market was least affected by the decline in sales, but only marginally showing a percentage drop of 13.3 while LA and Orange counties declined by 17.9 percent and San Diego dropped by 14.5 percent.

The California Auto Outlook Third Quarter 2022 Market Report provides comprehensive information on the state’s new vehicle market. The report includes annual trends, two-year perspective, segment watch, including the top five models in each segment, brand scoreboards, regional comparisons, and more. The complete report can be accessed here.

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California Auto Outlook Quarterly is produced for CNCDA by Auto Outlook, Inc., an independent research company specializing in the analysis of statewide and regional automotive markets. When reporting these auto industry trends please acknowledge the Data Source: Experian.

About CNCDA

For more than 95 years, California New Car Dealers Association has represented the interests of California’s franchised new car dealers. CNCDA members are primarily engaged in the retail sale and lease of new and used motor vehicles, but also provide customers with automotive products, parts, service and repair. Our members sold more than 2 million new cars and trucks in 2019 and employed more than 140,000 Californians, significantly contributing to our state’s economy. As the nation’s largest state association of franchised new car and truck dealers—with more than 1,200 members—CNCDA provides legal compliance and legislative, regulatory, and legal advocacy. 

TIME AND ALLY FINANCIAL HONOR DOWNEY DEALER

Tim Hutcherson Wins National Recognition for Community Service and Industry Accomplishments

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

2023 TIME Dealer of the Year, Tim Hutcherson, Downey Nissan, Downey, CA

(New York, NY, October 18, 2022) The nomination of Tim Hutcherson, owner and dealer principal at Downey Nissan in Downey, California, for the 2023 TIME Dealer of the Year award was announced today by TIME.

Hutcherson is one of a select group of 48 dealer nominees from across the country who will be honored at the 106th annual National Automobile Dealers Association (NADA) Show in Dallas, Texas, on January 27, 2023.

The TIME Dealer of the Year award is one of the automobile industry’s most prestigious and highly coveted honors. The award recognizes the nation’s most successful auto dealers who also demonstrate a long-standing commitment to community service. Hutcherson was chosen to represent the California New Car Dealers Association in the national competition – one of only 48 auto dealers nominated for the 54th annual award from more than 16,000 nationwide.

“It all started with the dream of becoming a car dealer,” nominee Hutcherson said. “Along the way I established a core philosophy of respecting employees, participating in the community and being a good leader.”

And that dream was forged during a Michigan winter, when Hutcherson started his career as a porter at a Lincoln-Mercury dealership.

“I swept the garage, organized the lot and washed the cars in the freezing snow, sleet and rain,” he said. “This was one of my three jobs during high school, but I went to work every day with the mindset that I would try my best at whatever task was put in front of me. It was far from a glamorous job, but I was proud to be in the business.“

After earning an associate degree at Schoolcraft College in Livonia, Michigan, in 1976, Hutcherson moved to California and landed a position as a parts driver for Bob Curtis Oldsmobile in Torrance.

“The general manager approached me to be a salesperson,” he said. “From that moment, my dream was to become a car dealer, and I made it my goal to learn as much as possible.”

Hutcherson worked at a few different dealerships in Los Angeles in sales management positions before joining forces with Bill Adkins to revive failing dealerships that Adkins was buying. “I would go into his newly acquired stores that were struggling and establish my business model to turn them around,” he said. “After years of service, I acquired equity in numerous stores with Mr. Adkins.”

By 2008, Hutcherson was awarded an open point by Nissan in Downey. Soon after the store was opened, the recession hit, and Hutcherson wasn’t sure Downey Nissan would survive. “I sold my home and rental property to keep the doors open,” he said.

But his hard work and instincts paid off. Hutcherson’s business began to grow, and he built a new state-of-the-art facility from the ground up just down the street from his original location in“It was the first NREDI 2.0 [Nissan Retail Environment Design Initiative] store in the Western United States,” he said. “We have been the number one Nissan dealer in the Western United States for the last five years and have achieved Nissan’s Global Award for customer service during that time as well.”

Today, Hutcherson also owns Nissan of Tustin in Tustin, California, and his two children, Brittany and Connor, are the next generation to join the family enterprise.

“I think a huge part of my success is my employees,” he said. “From day one, I have wanted to create a space where people are proud and happy to come to work. It has been most rewarding to see the dream of the young man working three jobs come true.”

Hutcherson also believes that a strong commitment to his local community has helped fuel the growth of his business. “If you have the ability to lift someone up, do it,” he said. “A successful car dealership is a pillar in the community, and we give back to the people who support us.”

To that end, he has held blood drives, toy drives, car shows, golf tournaments, Christmas tree giveaways, back-to-school supply drives, clothing drives for homeless veterans, pet adoption events and other events that add to the quality of life in his local area. For the last 13 years, Hutcherson has sponsored the Downey Nissan Scholarship, which is awarded to the student with the highest graduating GPA at Downey High School. Additionally, he has donated multiple cars to the Downey High School Auto Technology program so that students can have a true hands-on learning experience.

For his good works, Hutcherson has received the 2018 Shared Values Award from the Downey Unified Board of Education and the Mayor’s Downey DNA Award in 2018, which recognizes individuals and businesses that exhibit extraordinary leadership and exceptional service to the community. This year, Hutcherson was awarded the Mayors Impact award, the highest award for a citizen of Downey.

Dealers are nominated by the executives of state and metro dealer associations around the country. A panel of faculty members from the Tauber Institute for Global Operations at the University of Michigan will select one finalist from each of the four NADA regions and one national Dealer of the Year. Three finalists will receive $5,000 for their favorite charities and the winner will receive $10,000 to give to charity, donated by Ally.

In its 12th year as exclusive sponsor, Ally also will recognize dealer nominees and their community efforts by contributing $1,000 to each nominee’s 501(c)3 charity of choice. Nominees will be recognized on AllyDealerHeroes.com, which highlights the philanthropic contributions and achievements of TIME Dealer of the Year nominees.

“For over 50 years, TIME has been committed to recognizing the impact of automotive dealers on their communities with the TIME Dealer of the Year award,” said Edward Felsenthal, editor in chief and CEO, TIME. “We are proud to continue the legacy of honoring these works of service with our partners at Ally.”

Doug Timmerman, president of dealer financial services, Ally, said, “Auto dealers across the country who are nominated for this award each year are committed to not only doing it right and leading in a rapidly changing automotive industry but to strengthening their communities through giving back. The TIME Dealer of the Year program celebrates dealers who are the role models of the retail auto industry for their continuous efforts to lift up and support their
employees, customers and communities.”

Hutcherson was nominated for the TIME Dealer of the Year award by Brian Maas, president of the California New Car Dealers Association. He and his wife, Carol, have four children among them.

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About TIME
TIME is the 99-year-old global media brand that reaches a combined audience of more than 100 million around the world through its iconic magazine and digital platforms. With unparalleled access to the world’s most influential people, the trust of consumers and partners globally, and an unrivaled power to convene, TIME’s mission is to tell the essential stories of the people and ideas that shape and improve the world. Today, TIME’s 360° suite of products and platforms for storytelling also includes the Emmy Award®-winning film and television division TIME Studios, a significantly expanded live events business built on the powerful TIME100 and Person of the Year franchises, an industry-leading web3 division, an award-winning branded content studio, the website-building platform TIME Sites and more.

About Ally Financial
Ally Financial Inc. (NYSE: ALLY) is a digital financial services company committed to its promise to “Do It Right” for its consumer, commercial and corporate customers. Ally is composed of an industry-leading independent auto finance and insurance operation, an award-winning digital direct bank (Ally Bank, Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender, which offers mortgage lending, point-of-sale personal lending, and a variety of deposit and other banking products), a corporate finance business for equity sponsors and middle-market companies, and securities brokerage and investment advisory services. Our brand conviction is that we are all better off with an ally, and our focus is on helping our customers achieve their strongest financial well-being, a notion personalized to what is important to them. For more information, please visit www.ally.com and follow @allyfinancial.

About the NADA Show
The annual NADA Show brings together more than 20,000 franchised dealers and their employees, industry leaders, manufacturers and exhibitors to learn about the latest auto industry tools, trends, products and technologies.

About CNCDA
For more than 95 years, California New Car Dealers Association has represented the interests of California’s franchised new car dealers. CNCDA members are primarily engaged in the retail sale and lease of new and used motor vehicles, but also provide customers with automotive products, parts, service and repair. Our members sold more than 2 million new cars and trucks in 2019 and employed more than 140,000 Californians, significantly contributing to our state’s economy. As the nation’s largest state association of franchised new car and truck dealers—with more than 1,200 members—CNCDA provides legal compliance and legislative, regulatory, and legal advocacy. 

CNCDA Comment Letter Re: Motor Vehicle Dealers Trade Regulation Rule

September 7, 2022

Federal Trade Commission Office of the Secretary
600 Pennsylvania Avenue NW, Suite CC–5610 (Annex C)
Washington, DC 20580

Re: Motor Vehicle Dealers Trade Regulation Rule—Rulemaking, No. P204800

To the Commissioners:

Thank you for the opportunity to submit written comments on the Motor Vehicle Dealers Trade Regulation Rule (Proposed Rule). The California New Car Dealers Association (CNCDA) is a statewide trade association that represents the interests of over 1,200 franchised new car and truck dealer members. CNCDA members are primarily engaged in the retail sale and lease of new and used motor vehicles, but also provide customers with parts, service, and automotive repair.

Focus and Organization of Comments
CNCDA agrees with the National Automobile of Dealers Association (NADA) and many others that the Proposed Rule will greatly and unnecessarily increase the complexity of consumer motor vehicle sale and lease transactions, which are already regulated by a myriad of federal and state requirements. However, our comments are focused on the unique issues regarding implementation of the Proposed Rule in California, as conflicting state requirements also regulate dealers. As we illustrate in this letter, the Proposed Rule’s preemption clause does not adequately address this problem, as it is unclear whether California law or the Proposed Rule offers greater consumer protection in many circumstances.1

Proposed Rule Section 463.5(b) Conflicts with California’s Precontract Disclosure Requirements
Proposed Rule section 463.5(b) prohibits charging for “undisclosed or unselected Add-ons.” California’s Automobile Sales Finance Act (ASFA) contains a similar precontract disclosure requirement. It states that California dealers must “prior to the execution of a conditional sales contract […] provide to a buyer, and obtain the buyer’s signature on, a written disclosure that sets forth” specific information regarding the price and itemization of six enumerated categories of optional products.2 These categories include service contracts, debt cancellations agreements (e.g., GAP), theft deterrent devices, and surface protection products. 3 The ASFA further requires dealers to identify and separately disclose each item within the six enumerated categories in the final conditional sales contract.4 The precontract disclosure must also include the consumer’s installment payments with and without the charges associated with the items in the six enumerated categories.

The Proposed Rule’s add-on requirements are clearly designed to achieve the same goal as California’s precontract disclosure (i.e., to promote transparency in the car buying process by separately disclosing optional products prior to sale). However, in practice it may be difficult (if not impossible) to comply with both the Proposed Rule and California law without providing duplicative and confusing documents to consumers.

When attempting to reconcile California law and the Proposed Rule, a major problem is that the two define optional products (i.e., “add ons”) differently. While California law is more prescriptive (identifying six categories of optional products), the Proposed Rule is potentially broader in scope, as it is not limited to any categories. However, simply applying the Proposed Rule’s broader scope to California’s precontract disclosure requirements is problematic because California requires more detailed itemization and links certain disclosures in the conditional sales contract to the six categories of optional products.5

The potentially irreconcilable differences between California’s pre-contract disclosure requirements and the Proposed Rule could force California dealers to provide to consumers two very similar (yet slightly different) documents disclosing optional products to consumers. This would serve no one’s interest, frustrating both dealers and consumers with an unnecessary and confusing process.

Proposed Rule Section 463.5(a) Conflicts with Pending California Restrictions on the Sale of GAP
The Proposed Rule prohibits dealers from selling “add-ons that provide no benefit.” The vagueness of this rule and the breadth of its scope are troubling. With respect to the sale of a guaranteed asset protection waiver (GAP) specifically, the Proposed Rule states that it cannot be sold if the “loan-to-value ratio would result in the consumer not benefiting financially.”6 The application of this rule in practice could result in enormous confusion and potentially conflict with pending California law.

After they are purchased, vehicles depreciate at wildly different rates. For example, luxury sedans historically depreciate much more quickly than mass-market compact SUVs. As such, whether GAP provides a benefit could vary based on each vehicle’s individual depreciation curve and the duration of the loan.

California is seeking to accomplish the FTC’s aims (prevent the sale of GAP when it provides no benefit to consumers) by adopting a rule that provides a bright line on when the sale of GAP is acceptable. In the coming days we expect Governor Newsom to sign Assembly Bill 2311 into law, which would prohibit dealers from selling GAP when a vehicle has less than a 70% loan-to-value ratio.7

It’s unclear how California’s bright-line rule will interact with the Proposed Rule’s prohibition on the sale of products with ‘no benefit’. Absent further FTC guidance, it is conceivable that the FTC could take the position that whether GAP provides a benefit requires an individualized determination based on a vehicle’s unique depreciation curve and/or the duration of the loan. This would be a compliance nightmare for California dealers, as adherence to the strict limits on the sale of GAP in AB 2311 could still subject a dealer to liability.

For the above-mentioned reasons, we ask that the FTC either eliminate the vague and confusing requirement on the sale of products with “no benefit.” At a minimum, the FTC should provide clear practical guidance on how to apply this requirement.

Conclusion
CNCDA agrees with the FTC that the interests of consumers and ethical dealers are served by the uniform enforcement of sensible regulations. However, we have substantial concerns about the implementation of the Proposed Rule in California. Without clarification, the Proposed Rule may force ethical dealers to choose between violating California and federal law, and it appears likely that the Proposed Rule will result in a more confusing and lengthy purchasing process for California consumers.

We appreciate the opportunity to comment and look forward to further guidance. Should you have any questions about the issues raised in this letter, do not hesitate to contact me.

Sincerely,

Anthony Bento, Director of Legal and Regulatory Affairs
California New Car Dealers Association



1 The Proposed Rule preempts conflicting state laws that do not afford consumers protections “greater than the protection provided under the” Proposed Rule. (Proposed Rule § 463.9(b).)
2 Cal. Civil Code section 2982.2. California Vehicle Code section 11713.19 also broadly prohibits dealers from “negotiat[ing] the terms of a vehicle sales or lease contract and then add[ing] charges to the contract for any goods or services without previously disclosing to the customer the goods and services to be added and obtaining the consumer’s consent.”3 Cal. Civil Code section 2982.2.
4 Cal. Civil Code section 2982(a)(1).
5 Cal. Civil Code section 2982(a)(1) (requiring individual itemization of a theft deterrent device, surface protection product, service contract, optional debt cancellation agreement (i.e., GAP)).
6 Proposed Rule section 463.5(a)(2).
7 AB 2311 is sponsored by the California Attorney General and received near-unanimous support in the California legislature. As of the date of this letter, it awaits Governor Newsom’s signature. The bill can be accessed at: https://leginfo.legislature.ca.gov/faces/billNavClient.xhtml?bill_id=202120220AB2311


New Car Dealers All-In for EVs, Urges CARB to Approve Formal Midterm Review for Pending ZEV Mandate

For Immediate Release, 8.24.22

SACRAMENTO, CA – With the California Air Resources Board expected to meet tomorrow and approve a ban on the sale of new gasoline-powered vehicles by 2035, the California New Car Dealers Association reaffirms our commitment for being all-in on electric vehicles.  

Franchised new car dealers are committed to working with lawmakers and regulators to increase the supply and adoption of ZEVs. New car dealers will be crucial in educating consumers about what this new technology means for their driving habits and transportation needs.  

“CNCDA is officially requesting that the California Air Resources Board incorporate a formal midterm review to evaluate progress on regulations to ensure Californians have continued access to affordable and available electric vehicles,” said Brian Maas, CNCDA President.  

As stakeholders work to implement CARB’s ruling, there are important considerations that CNCDA would like addressed, including:  

  • Customer choice and vehicle availability: Despite California leading the nation in ZEV market share, ZEVs still only represent a fraction of the two million new passenger and light-duty vehicles sold annually. We need more ZEVs widely available that meet the needs of consumers. 
  • Affordability: ZEVs are considerably more costly up-front than gas-powered vehicles, and often are prohibitively expensive for low-income consumers. We must address affordability and equity challenges, or many customers will not be able to make the switch to ZEVs.
  • Infrastructure: We need to expand the availability of convenient, fast charging infrastructure, beyond work sites and single-family dwellings, to encourage consumers to make the switch.

California’s new car dealers are essential to consumer transition to ZEVs and we look forward to working with the California Air Resources Board and vehicle manufacturers to meet the state’s electric vehicle mandate in these new regulations.  

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About CNCDA

For more than 95 years, California New Car Dealers Association has represented the interests of California’s franchised new car dealers. CNCDA members are primarily engaged in the retail sale and lease of new and used motor vehicles, but also provide customers with automotive products, parts, service and repair. Our members sold more than 2 million new cars and trucks in 2019 and employed more than 140,000 Californians, significantly contributing to our state’s economy. As the nation’s largest state association of franchised new car and truck dealers—with more than 1,200 members—CNCDA provides legal compliance and legislative, regulatory, and legal advocacy. 

ALERT: SB 986 (Umberg) – STRONG OPPOSE

CATALYTIC CONVERTER LEGISLATION WILL INCREASE CONSUMER PRICES WITHOUT SOLVING THEFT PROBLEM

DOWNLOAD YOUR #REJECTSB986 TOOLKIT HERE.

The California New Car Dealers Association (CNCDA), the Alliance for Automotive Innovation (AAI) and the National Auto Actions Association (NAAA) strongly oppose SB 986 (Umberg), which seeks to impose an unworkable new obligation on auto dealerships and auto auctions by requiring them to permanently mark the vehicle identification number (VIN) on the catalytic converters of virtually every new and used vehicle sold in the State of California. While we respect the intent of the author, SB 986 is unworkable and will ultimately result in increased costs for consumers while doing nothing to address rampant catalytic converter theft in California.

  1. Massive new costs would increase the cost of new and used vehicles. California’s new car dealers sell approximately 3.5 million new and used vehicles per year. SB 986 would require dealers to etch the vehicle identification number (VIN) on the catalytic converter on each vehicle before selling it. This onerous new mandate would result in over 3.5 million hours of required labor by vehicle technicians annually. Unfortunately, the significant new cost burden on California’s new car dealers, created by SB 986 would be felt directly by consumers across the state as many are already struggling with high costs and inflation. 
  2. SB 986 is a patchwork measure that will not solve theft issues. SB 986 is NOT a preventative measure, but rather seeks to address a prosecutorial gap in current law by putting this obligation on the backs of California’s dealerships, vehicle sellers and ultimately consumers. Catalytic converter theft victimizes all Californians. A comprehensive, meaningful deterrent is necessary, but SB 986 is a scattershot approach and does not provide any guarantee there will be a decrease in catalytic converter theft.  

CNCDA, AAI and NAAA are committed to playing a critical role in curbing catalytic converter theft. However, SB 986 is not a sound solution. For these reasons, we respectfully ask you to OPPOSE SB 986. Please do not hesitate to contact me if you would like to discuss our position further. #RejectSB986 #CALeg

Sincerely,

Alisa Reinhardt,
CNCDA Director of Government Affairs
Alliance for Automotive Innovation
National Auto Auctions Association

California New Car Dealers Association Releases Second Quarter Auto Outlook

Contact: Autumn Heacox, Communications and Marketing Director: aheacox@cncda.org

Economic Turmoil Allows Car Dealers to Replenish Supply, Fulfill Needs
Californian’s Desire for Electric Vehicles Drives Demand

SACRAMENTO, CA – As expected the high pent-up demand for both new and used vehicles is holding strong and will provide a boost in California’s vehicle market despite a weakening economy.   

While the current economic impact of low unemployment and high inflation is felt across nearly every industry in the nation, the demand for both new and used vehicles remains strong in the State. While lower economic growth and weakening consumer affordability is hitting most industries hard, new vehicles registrations in California are expected to only soften a bit in the coming months as we expect about 1.8 million new vehicles to be sold in the state during 2022, down slightly from 2021 but better than the 1.64 million in 2020.

Although vehicle sales in the United States dropped 18.3 percent, California’s decline in sales only fell 17.9 percent for 2022. Interestingly, in California, domestic car registrations only fell 6.3 percent as compared to an 11 percent decline nationwide. Similarly, California’s light truck registrations also fell by less than U.S. numbers (14.6 percent vs 15.9 percent) while increasing in market share by 2.7 points year-to- date.

“As the vehicle market continues to navigate high demand, chip shortages, supply chain issues and production problems, the current economy could allow dealerships to help replenish their inventories as manufacturing of new vehicles is able to catch-up with demand, California New Car Dealers Association Chairman, John Oh, General Manager of Lexus of Westminster. “We are thankful California isn’t being hit as deeply as other regions in the nation across all vehicle registration sectors. Additionally, we are seeing some increased interest in the electric vehicle market that are very promising.”

Brand Market Share

While most brand registrations saw declines, both Tesla and Genesis were able to capture the windfall, indicating that California consumers are increasingly interested in purchasing alternative powered vehicles. Electric vehicle sales reached the highest numbers reported in the last five years, hitting 15.1 percent year-to-date—a sharp increase from last year’s 9.5% total.  Tesla registrations increased by 82.2 percent and Genesis saw an increase of 53 percent. Kia, Mercedes, BMW, Ford, and Subaru saw less than 15 percent declines. Toyota continues to lead both the non-luxury car and light truck brand market share by 34.5% and 21.1%, respectively.

Segment Market Share

Larger, family-friendly vehicles continue their reign as those most sought by consumers, bringing their market share to 35 percent, down one percent from last year. Small cars saw a larger decline, hitting 11 percent, down from 16 percent last year. Luxury SUVs saw a two percent increase from last year, making up 17 percent of sales, with non-luxury mid and large sized cars remaining relatively stagnant at 9 percent, and the luxury and sports car segment increasing to 11 percent.  

Model and Brand Rankings

The Tesla Model Y reigns as the top selling car in the California market with 42,320 registrations so far this year. In second place: the Tesla Model 3 with 38,993 units sold, further indicating the statewide demand for EVs. New registrations of the Honda Civic, Toyota Camry and Corolla, the state’s top-selling mainstays, were impacted by inventory shortages but still remained at the top of their segment categories.

Regional Variances

The San Francisco Bay market seems to be the least affected by the decline in sales, posing the smallest statewide percentage drop at 12.9 percent. Overall statewide sales in the first two quarters of 2022 dropped 16.4 percent lower than in 2021. Northern California was slightly more insulated with a 15.9 percent drop to Southern California’s 16.6 percent.

The California Auto Outlook Second Quarter 2022 Market Report provides comprehensive information on the state’s new vehicle market. The report includes annual trends, two-year perspective, segment watch, including the top five models in each segment, brand scoreboards, regional comparisons, and more. The complete Q2 2022 report can be accessed here.

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California Auto Outlook Quarterly is produced for CNCDA by Auto Outlook, Inc., an independent research company specializing in the analysis of statewide and regional automotive markets. When reporting these auto industry trends please acknowledge the Data Source: Experian.

About CNCDA

For more than 95 years, California New Car Dealers Association has represented the interests of California’s franchised new car dealers. CNCDA members are primarily engaged in the retail sale and lease of new and used motor vehicles, but also provide customers with automotive products, parts, service and repair. Our members sold more than 2 million new cars and trucks in 2019 and employed more than 140,000 Californians, significantly contributing to our state’s economy. As the nation’s largest state association of franchised new car and truck dealers—with more than 1,200 members—CNCDA provides legal compliance and legislative, regulatory, and legal advocacy. 

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